Skip to main content

Leader Pelosi's Blunders

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-California) is under heat because of the Democratic Party's losses in the four contests that have been held to replace Trump administration appointees.

Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic leader in the House

One of the first Trump appointees to be confirmed was CIA Director Mike Pompeo, who vacated his seat as the US Representative from Kansas' fourth district. The district is solidly Republican and Pompeo performed very strongly there in his bids, but the Democrats worked to turn their grassroots anti-Trump energy into votes against Republican candidate Ron Estes, the former state treasurer. In part because the DCCC made a minimal investment in the race, Estes won by a little less than seven points.

Trump appointed Ryan Zinke for Secretary of the Interior, leaving his Montana congressional seat up for grabs. Perhaps learning that a larger investment should've been made in the Kansas special election, the Democrats allocated more plentiful resources to the Democratic candidate in the Montana race, folk singer Ron Quist. Like in Kansas, Democrats were much closer than usual in Montana -- they lost by just over six points. However, this wasn't necessarily a testament to Quist's politicking or the Democrats' ability -- the Republican nominee, Greg Gianforte, had been plagued by his last-minute body slamming of a reporter.

However, the big showdown for the Democrats was not in Kansas or Montana -- it was in the sixth district of Georgia, the seat vacated by HHS Secretary Tom Price. While the sixth was believed to be solidly Republican, Trump barely secured it in the 2016 election. Democrats rightfully saw the race as competitive, and the big spenders and the Democratic bosses allocated $23 million to promote their candidate, documentary filmmaker Jon Ossoff. However, this out-of-state backing came to hurt Ossoff, who was hampered by allegations that he would be in the back pocket of Pelosi and other Hollywood liberals. After a hard fought campaign, Ossoff lost to Republican nominee Karen Handel, the former Secretary of State of Georgia, by just under four points. This contrasted strongly with many of the polls, some of which showed him ahead by as much as seven points.

Pelosi's big mistake was allocating money to the Georgia special election and not to the one in South Carolina. In the fifth district of the latter state, Mick Mulvaney vacated his congressional seat to assume office as the head of the Office of Management and Budget. The election to replace him produced Ralph Norman, a former member of the state legislature, as the Republican nominee and Archie Parnell, a former Goldman Sachs employee, as the Democratic nominee. Since the district went so solidly for Mulvaney in the previous elections, Democrats refused to allocate money to Parnell, who was using his shoestring budget to target African-American voters.

With the help of the African-American voters that he could target with his campaign's minimal financing, Parnell lost by just over three points in a district that Mulvaney had won by double digit margins in his bids. With more funding from the DCCC and further support from Pelosi, Parnell would've been able to represent the single Democratic success in the four special elections.

However, Nancy Pelosi chose to overspend on the Georgia special election and practically ignore the sounder investment -- the South Carolina race. She dug a hole for herself and the Democrats and solidified her reputation as an ineffective leader for the Democrats in this day and age.

As a Republican, I beg the Democrats to keep Pelosi on board as their leader. She is a California liberal who is disenfranchised from the rest of America, representing leftist policies that the bulk of the people are uninterested in. She is leading her party down a path of obstructionism against Trump but without principles to justify it, setting herself apart from the genius of former Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky).

Comments